Lauren Woodman

CEO

NetHope

Lauren Woodman is CEO of NetHope, a consortium of 50-plus global nonprofits that empower committed organizations to change the world through the power of technology. NetHope and its members unite with technology corporations and funding partners to design, fund, apply, adapt and scale technology-based solutions to some of the world’s most intractable problems in development, humanitarian response and conservation. NetHope harnesses technology to transform how nonprofit organizations operate and deliver aid to advance their missions. In the process, NetHope builds a platform of hope for those who receive aid and those who deliver it.

Lauren’s career has been defined by the intersection of technology, development and policy. Prior to assuming the leadership role at NetHope in 2014, Lauren held a variety of high-level positions, including: managing Microsoft Corporation’s global education and government programs for more than a decade; serving as an executive at the Software and Information Industry Association; and shaping policy at the United Nations. Lauren holds a master’s degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a bachelor’s degree from Smith College.

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Points of Light Conference
Attn: Events
600 Means Street, Suite 210
Atlanta, Georgia 30318

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For information on corporate sponsorship, contact Kate Nichols.

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For media inquiries, contact Meghann Gibbons.

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What Others Are Saying

This is one of the few events where all members of the social good sector are in attendance. With business, nonprofit and public sectors attending, we can dig deeper and have cross-sector conversations.

— 2018 Atlanta Attendee

The conference proved to be one of the most engaging and exciting professional gatherings of like-minded people I've ever attended. Although the topics, content, and presentations all appropriately centered around volunteering and service in some way, the sheer range of them was simply astounding.

— 2017 Seattle Attendee